US tech industry says immigration order affects their operations

The U.S. tech industry has warned that a temporary entry suspension on certain foreign nationals introduced on Friday by the administration of President Donald Trump will impact these companies’ operations that are dependent on foreign workers.Trump inauguration

The Internet Association, which has a number of tech companies including Google, Amazon, Facebook and Microsoft as its members, said that Trump’s executive order limiting immigration and movement into the U.S. has troubling implications as its member companies and firms in many other industries include legal immigrant employees who are covered by the orders and will not be able to return back to their jobs and families in the U.S.

“Their work benefits our economy and creates jobs here in the United States,” said Internet Association President and CEO Michael Beckerman in a statement over the weekend.

Executives of a number of tech companies like Twitter, Microsoft and Netflix have expressed concern about the executive order signed by Trump, which suspended for 90 days entry into the U.S. of persons from seven Muslim-majority countries – Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen – as immigrants and non-immigrants. The Trump administration has described the order as a move to prevent foreign terrorist entry into the U.S.

Tech companies like Uber, Apple, Microsoft and Google are in touch with employees affected by the order, according to reports. Uber is working on a scheme to compensate some of its drivers who come from the listed countries and had taken long breaks to see their extended families and are now unable to come back to the U.S., wrote CEO Travis Kalanick, who is a member of Trump’s business advisory group.

“As an immigrant and as a CEO, I’ve both experienced and seen the positive impact that immigration has on our company, for the country, and for the world,” wrote Satya Nadella, Microsoft CEO, in an online post over the weekend. “We will continue to advocate on this important topic.” Netflix CEO Reed Hastings wrote in a Facebook post that “Trump’s actions are hurting Netflix employees around the world, and are so un-American it pains us all.”

The tech industry is also concerned about further moves by the government on immigration policy that could place restrictions on visas for the entry of people who help these companies run their operations and develop products and services. The H-1B visa program have been criticized for replacing U.S. workers.

Microsoft’s Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith said in a note to employees on Saturday that the company believes in “a strong and balanced high-skilled immigration system.”

About 150 Delta flights in the US canceled after systems outage

About 150 flights of Delta Air Lines in the U.S. were canceled and some others were delayed on Sunday on account of an IT systems outage, the airline reported.delta air lines aircraft

Delta said more flight cancellations were expected.

The IT systems outage at Delta is the latest of a number that have affected airline operations recently.

Delta reported earlier that its teams were working to fix quickly a systems outage that has resulted in departure delays and cancellations. It did not provide information on the systems issue that had caused the outage.

“Not all delays and cancellations are being reflected on Delta systems, including delta.com, the Fly Delta App, airport information screens or through our Reservations agents,” the airline said. It reported at 11:45 p.m. EST that a ground stop had been lifted.

The Federal Aviation Administration had earlier reported a ground stop for all Delta mainline and sub-carrier flights to domestic destinations. The agency cited “automation issues” at Delta and said international flights were not affected.

After the lifting of the ground stop, Delta CEO Ed Bastian apologized to customers affected by “this frustrating situation.” On Twitter and other social media, a number of flyers complained about the delays. Airports reported varying duration of delays of flights. At one point, Denver International Airport reported that Delta flights at the airport were “delayed an average of 90 minutes but still moving.”

Delta had reassured users that flights in the air remain unaffected, but added that some customers are experiencing delays upon landing, particularly at Delta’s hub airports. The airline is providing updates on its web site.

The airline faced an outage in August, when it said that a power outage in its operations center in Atlanta had affected its computer systems and operations worldwide, leading to flight delays.

Delta has 830 aircraft of which 644 are owned by the airline, while the rest are leased. It operates more than 15,000 daily flights including those by worldwide alliance partners, and serves 180 million customers each year. Rival United Airlines also reported an outage earlier this month, citing an IT issue.